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The Health Care Quandary

Traditionally, most Americans placed a high value on personal responsibility. They believed people should provide for themselves by working hard, living within their means, and saving money for unexpected needs, notably illness. At the same time, they believed that parents should help children, children should help parents, siblings should help one another, and neighbors should help neighbors.

The traditional view no longer dominates. Many Americans emphasize rights more than responsibilities.… Read More

 

Elder Abuse, Government Style

Geriatric Chair FinalThere are many good reasons for recommending geriatric chairs for individuals in Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs), particularly those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. And yet the federal government and most state governments have classified the chairs as restraining devices and restricted their use. Good intentions notwithstanding, that action did a great disservice to our most vulnerable citizens.

Geriatric chairs, also known as geri-chairs, are mobile recliners, with ergonomically designed seats and backs of polyurethane-covered foam, and three different positions—in other words, the perfect chairs for non-ambulatory residents of assisted living facilities, allowing them to leave their beds and sit comfortably in the living room, on the porch, or at the dining room table.Read More

 

Progressivism’s Fundamental Flaw

Francis Galton (Bing)Progressivism is the dominant political and social philosophy of our time. Even people who know little about it tend to regard it favorably. They believe that since progress suggests moving forward, developing, and improving, Progressivism must be positive and good. But Progressivism doesn’t deserve this favorable image because it is rooted in a profound falsehood—that the vast majority of human beings are mentally deficient and nothing can be done to alter their condition.Read More

 

Enjoying Your Obamelet?

White House KitchenObamelet is an apt metaphor for the President’s transformation of the economy. It recalls Vladimir Lenin’s statement, made 75 years ago in reference to the Great Famine in Ukraine:  “If you want to make an omelet, you must be willing to break a few eggs.” Let’s be clear: I am not labeling the President a murderer or a communist like Lenin. Nor am I implying that he is intentionally hurting people.… Read More

 

Don’t Raise The Debt Ceiling- LOWER It!

FranklinDoes the debt ceiling debate seem familiar? It should. From the Carter administration to the Obama administration the debt ceiling has been raised 39 times. Each time the increase was opposed but then passed by the opposition party.

It’s like a political variation on the silent movie drama in which the poor damsel says, “I can’t pay the rent,” the villainous landlord demands, “You must pay the rent,” and the young hero declares, “I’ll pay the rent.” In the political version, the parties take turns playing the villain.… Read More

 

Who WROTE The Health Care Act?

Many legislators have admitted they didn’t read the Affordable Health Care Act before voting on it. Instead, they took Nancy Pelosi’s bizarre advice: “But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.” That line suggests a thought process right out of the Theater of the Absurd: This measure is controversial, but we’re going to postpone addressing the controversy until after we’ve read the measure, and we’re going to postpone reading it until we’ve passed it into a law binding on all Americans. Read More

 

Ending Legislative Gobbledygook

chestertonI recently commented on the absurdity of having members of Congress vote on bills they have not had time to read. This essay addresses a closely related problem—the fact that most bills are difficult, if not impossible, to understand even when there is ample time to read them. Here are two typical passages:

Excerpt from the Final Version of the Affordable Health Care Act, Sec. 107.… Read More